Google Penguin & Google Panda Explained


Google Penguin & Google Panda Explained

Google Penguin is a code name for a Google algorithm update that was Search Engine Optimization 2first announced on April 24, 2012. The update is aimed at decreasing search engine rankings of websites that violate Google’s Webmaster Guidelines by using black-hat SEO techniques, such as keyword stuffing, cloaking, participating in link schemes, deliberate creation of duplicate content, and others.

Penguin’s effect on Google search results

By Google’s estimates, Penguin affects approximately 3.1% of search queries in English, about 3% of queries in languages like German, Chinese, and Arabic, and an even bigger percentage of them in “highly-spammed” languages. On May 25th, 2012, Google unveiled the latest Penguin update, called Penguin 1.1. This update, according to Matt Cutts, was supposed to impact less than one-tenth of a percent of English searches. The guiding principle for the update was to penalize websites using manipulative techniques to achieve high rankings. Penguin 3 was released Oct. 5, 2012 and affected 0.3% of queries.

The differences between Penguin and previous updates

Before Penguin, Google released a series of algorithm updates called Panda with the first appearing in February 2011. Panda aimed at downranking websites that provided poor user experience. To identify such websites, a machine-learning algorithm by Navneet Panda was used, hence the name. The algorithm follows the logic by which Google’s human quality raters determine a website’s quality.

(Source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Penguin)

 

To be clear about Google Penguin:

The “use of keywords in anchor text” is not the problem. It is rather the MISMATCH between keywords used in anchor texts for submissions and the keywords actually showing in the meta tag info of your landing pages (be it home or any sub page).

Google states (regarding Penguin):

1. Avoid hidden text or hidden links.

2. Don’t use cloaking or sneaky redirects.

3. Don’t send automated queries to Google.

4. Don’t load pages with irrelevant keywords.

5. Don’t create multiple pages, sub domains, or domains with substantially duplicate content.

6. Don’t create pages with malicious behavior, such as phishing or installing viruses, trojans, or other mal-ware.

7. Avoid “doorway” pages created just for search engines or other “cookie cutter” approaches such as affiliate programs with little or no original content.

8. If your site participates in an affiliate program, make sure that your site adds value. Provide unique and relevant content that gives users a reason to visit your site first.

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